The Sea Collection

By Nina Zulian

Carrageenan

Carrageenan
Valentina Márquez, Carolina Pacheco, Fernanda Vio, Tomás Vivanco

Mussel shell

Mussel shell
Carolina Pacheco

Shrimp shells

Shrimp shells
Jade Ruijzenaars

Seaweed

Seaweed
Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

Seaweed

Seaweed
Studio Nienke Hoogvliet

Seashell

Seashell
Studio Mixtura

Posidonia

Posidonia
Studiograma - Andrés Ramírez

About this collection

The Sea Collection aims to highlight projects that question the current linear economy ("take-make-dispose") and support circular thinking.

Designers from different parts of the world explore elements found at sea to produce materials that promise a more ecological and regenerative future. They show the importance of rethinking waste and its potential as a biodegradable and compostable raw material.

Andrés Ramírez (Studiograma.es) created a seafloor with Posidonia. A vital marine plant found in the Mediterranean Sea but also a species that is in danger of extinction.
The rhizome of the plant loses its fibres, the movement of the sea sews natural fibre balls, and the natural material arrives at the Mediterranean coasts. The project aim is to optimise using those natural balls to benefit the economy of the regions around this sea and help local and sustainable companies.

Caro Pacheco developed "Calcáreo", a biodegradable material similar to ceramic by using the waste of Chile's mussel-farming industry, which disposes of tons of mussel shells in landfills.

Another interesting project by Caro Pacheco is 'Lugae'. It's a biomaterial created from algae that can be used as a substitute for oil-based plastics. Valentina Marquez, Fernanda Vio and Tomás Vivanco contributed to the project.

Daria Biryukova (Studio Mixtura) developed colourful glazes made from local crushed shells' waste streams that can be applied in the ceramic industry. The project was created during her residency at the Vista Alegre Atlantis in Portugal.

Jade Ruijzenaars explores the potential of the shrimp shells discarded by the food markets in a new application in ceramic glazing. The majority of Dutch shrimp is caught in the North Sea, transported to Morocco to be peeled, and then shipped back again to Europe for consumption. Roughly 60-70% of a shrimp consists of its shell, which is not consumed and generates a high quantity of waste.

Nienke Hoogvliet and Tim Jongerius (Studio Nienke Hoogvliet) research the seaweed's potential to contribute to the more sustainable textile industry. The designers worked on creating a circular process to use the seaweed optimally, developing natural dyes and yarn. The waste to produce one product is used for another, ending up with zero-waste.

About Nina Zulian

The Sea Collection was curated by Nina Zulian, founder of the independent Plural Magazine. The online publication highlights design and research projects focusing on more sustainable initiatives and environmentally friendly materials and processes.

www.pluralmagazine.net

@pluralmagazine