Material

Fruit

By

Made in

Biodegradable 242 Bioplastic 80 Fibre 68 Plant-based 176 Polymer 40 Textile 96 Vegan 93 Algae 11 Vegetable glycerine 3

Fruit
Fruit
Fruit
Fruit
Fruit
Fruit
Fruit
Fruit

Photos: Enola Gil La Rocca

Revitalizing Yarn

Revitalizing Yarn is made from nuts, fruit waste, and algae, offers energetic properties, an alternative to the textile world, and at the same time, it starts creating awareness in human minds and social consumption.

We, Humans, have the habit of staying in the known, sometimes we feel so comfortable that we forget there’s a whole unknown world of possibilities out there.
The Textile industry is known as the second-largest polluter in the world, not only because of the unsustainable materials we use but also because of the process, there’s always new matter, even with the organic.

This material is not created to change the human mentality, but to generate awareness of what is happening in our surroundings, and to understand that we have alternatives to take care of nature which gives us so much every day.

The creation of a Revitalizing Yarn allows you to fly, a vast universe of ideas on how to work together with nature and not against it, therefore a new more conscious world will come, a world full of possibilities.

This is what we are looking for, meters of wellness.

(Thread made out of the waste of Pistachio, Peanut, Walnut Shells, and Avocado Seeds)

Making process

Revitalizing Yarn is made with a completely artisan process, beginning with the simplicity of drying the stone or shell of the fruit. Making it a powder is a must so it is able to blend with the other organic ingredients and become a paste that can then be extruded by hand and turned into this “pasta” like shape. The process will be done after letting it dry for a few days in the sunlight.

Text submitted by the maker and edited by the Future Materials Bank. For information about reproducing (a part of) this text, please contact the maker.

Ingredients

Dry fruit, vegetable glycerine, calcium, algae, water.

Credits

Elisava University